Precarious work and high-skilled youth in Europe
Contributi
Eugenia De Rosa, Elvira Gonzalez Gago, Susana Gonzalez Olcoz, Kari P. Hadjivassiliou, Tom Higgins, Annalisa Murgia, Flavia Pesce, Barbara Poggio, Catherine Rickard, Marcelo Segales Kirzner, Stefan Speckesser, Nicoletta Torchio
Livello
Studi, ricerche
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pp. 208,      1a edizione  2012   (Codice editore 365.937)

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In breve
Risk transitions and missing policies for young highly-skilled workers in Europe is a research project funded by the European Commission. The project aims to emphasise not only the occupational conditions of precarious workers, but the influence of a situation of uncertainty on crucial choices in the private lives of young Europeans.
Presentazione del volume

Trapped or flexible? Risk transitions and missing policies for young highly-skilled workers in Europe is a research project funded by the European Commission, DG Employment, Social Affairs & Inclusion.
Precarious workers occupy a grey area where basic employment and social protection rights are often significantly reduced, giving rise to a situation of uncertainty in all spheres of life.
The project aims to emphasise not only the occupational conditions of precarious workers, but - in a broader sense - the influence of a situation of uncertainty on crucial choices in the private lives of young Europeans.
Young people are in fact far more likely than other groups to be employed in precarious and insecure jobs, regardless of their education and skills. The effects of precarious employment could be particularly negative and persistent for young workers as problematic early experiences of transitions into work are likely to be associated with a general reduction in long-term life chances (the so called "scarring effect"). The increasing diffusion of precarious jobs among young people, including highly educated ones, also represents a social cost as the waste of young highly educated human resources reduces growth perspectives, while extending the poverty risks and the income inequalities within and between generations, with high budget costs related to lower fiscal revenues and higher social expenditures.
The project focuses on the risks faced by high-skilled workers of becoming unemployed or being forced to accept less qualified jobs and the ways to encourage the conversion of precarious work into work with rights.
The research activities included:
- A comparative analysis of the employment conditions of young highly skilled workers in the EU27 Member States.
- An assessment of the policies adopted in European countries to support the employability of young workers and to extend their access to social protection.
- Three in-depth country case studies (Italy, Spain and the UK) for a better understanding of the causes of differences and similarities in the labour market conditions of young skilled people.

Indice


Introduction
Part I. The European comparison
Manuela Samek Lodovici, Renata Semenza, Precarious work and high-skilled youth in Europe
(European comparative analysis: main research findings; Further research questions; Highly skilled young workers: a policy issue for Southern Europe)
Nicoletta Torchio, Recent trends and features of precarious work in Europe
(Incidence and characteristics of temporary work; Highly skilled young workers and precariousness; Temporary work in times of crisis; Labour market transitions)
Eugenia De Rosa, Flavia Pesce, Legislation and policies for young workers in Europe: an overview
(Policies for young workers between youth strategy and flexicurity; Employment protection legislation: temporary contracts and contractual arrangements; Policies and measures addressing youth needs during the crisis; Conclusions)
Part II. Country case studies
Annalisa Murgia , Brabara Poggi, Nicoletta Torchio, Italy: precariousness and skill mismatch
(Overview of precarious work and labour market transitions; Policies for young highly skilled workers; Qualitative analysis; Focus group with stakeholders)
Elvira González Gago , Susana González Olcoz, Marcelo Segales Kirzner, Spain: random transitions in the labour market
(Overview of precarious work and labour market transitions; Mapping national/local policies; Qualitative analysis; Focus group with stakeholders; Proposals and policy recommendations)
Kari P. Hadjivassiliou , Tom Higgins , Catherine Rickard, Stefan Speckesser, The UK: longer labour market transitions and deskilling
(Overview of precarious work and labour market transitions; National policies; Qualitative analysis; Focus group with stakeholders)
References.