Different strokes for different folks?

Intra-Household Sharing and Well-Being

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pp. 124,      1a edizione  2021   (Codice editore 1520.813)

Different strokes for different folks? Intra-Household Sharing and Well-Being
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Codice ISBN: 9788835110484
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In breve

This book focuses on financial well-being as a relevant dimension of individual welfare and examines whether and to what extent it can be argued that the economic independence of women contributes positively to their well-being and that of their partners. The topic is examined from various perspectives, thereby contributing to the theoretical discussion while also providing a test of theory for five European countries (Denmark, the UK, France, Ireland, Italy).

Presentazione del volume

Women's economic independence is considered to be one of modern society's greatest achievements. With it has come the perception that the greatest beneficiaries in this transition have been women with partners, in particular married women, who have more personal choice than ever before in whether to work or not. Yet, this achievement has been accompanied by puzzling scientific evidence indicating that women's well-being over the last decades has declined both in absolute terms and relative to men. This may be due to the many burdens and high personal expectations and pressures that modern women face. Similarly, men have also been found to be in an imbalanced situation in which they are potentially losing their role as major provider or breadwinner while at the same time not assuming greater responsibility for household work. This book focuses on financial well-being as a relevant dimension of individual welfare and examines whether and to what extent it can be argued that the economic independence of women-as reflected by the amount of income in their possession-contributes positively to their well-being and that of their partners. Does it make a difference for a woman whether she or her partner 'owns' money? Are men satisfied not to bear the main burden of providing for the family? If so, under what conditions? What forms of women's monetary contributions matter the most and the least for women and men? The topic is examined from various perspectives, thereby contributing to the theoretical discussion while also providing a test of theory for five European countries (Denmark, the UK, France, Ireland, Italy).

Nevena Kulic is a quantitative sociologist who studies inequality as it relates to families, education, and gender. She is a senior fellow in the Politics of Inequality cluster at the University of Konstanz and an adjunct professor in the School of Economics and Management at the University of Florence. Her research is focused on the topics of social stratification, educational inequality, women in the labour market, women in education, intra-household dynamics, and adult and child well-being.

Indice

Preface
Introduction
(Women's income as a source of inequality; Financial well-being; Countries; The organisation of the volume)
Theoretical perspectives and empirical design
(The resource theory of power, gender display and gender deviance neutralization; European Community Household survey; Sample; Questions; Research design)
Intra-Household sharing and the financial well-being of men and women
(Within-household inequality and poverty; Cross-country evidence and the new 'old' questions; Women's relative income share and individual financial satisfaction across countries and over time; Does money 'talk'? Evidence from five European countries)
Heterogenous patterns: how female education, civil status and family income affect sharing and financial satisfaction
(Additional sources of differentiation; Income sharing patterns in different families: An overview; Moderators of intra-household arrangements)
The colour of money: how different forms of income shape the financial satisfaction of men and women
(Re-examining the social meaning of money; 'Real' money versus 'just' money: The role of earnings, private savings and welfare benefits; Income sources: A portrait; Sources of female income and the financial satisfaction of men and women)
Intra-household sharing and financial satisfaction: macro-micro nexus
(Disentangling the (macro) context; Data sources; Women in education and the labour market across countries and over time; Gender role attitudes; Intra-household sharing and individual wellbeing: The role of women's educational attainment, labour market integration and gender role attitudes)
Conclusions
(The 'thresholds' of doing gender; Different families, different outcomes; Absolute versus relative resources: The value of money; Context 'embedded' in intra-household sharing; Country profiles; Final remarks)
List of figures and tables
References
Index.