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Le Group Relations conferences come intervento nell’organizzazione
Titolo Rivista: RICERCA PSICOANALITICA 
Autori/Curatori: Eliat Aram, Mannie Sher 
Anno di pubblicazione:  2013 Fascicolo: Lingua: Italiano 
Numero pagine:  18 P. 89-106 Dimensione file:  677 KB
DOI:  10.3280/RPR2013-001006
Il DOI è il codice a barre della proprietà intellettuale: per saperne di più:  clicca qui   qui 


Questo articolo individua le Group Relations (GR) come metodo di studio sui gruppi e come forma di osservazione del modo in cui le persone svolgono il loro ruolo all’interno dei gruppi e dei sistemi. Il metodo aiuta a distinguere tra fantasia e realtà, tra verità e falsità, a fare i conti tra proiezione e introiezione, transfert e controtransfert. L’articolo descrive le caratteristiche del lavoro delle GR, incluso il lavoro con i fenomeni legati al transfert e al contro-transfert; l’abilità nell’interpretazione delle dinamiche inconsce di gruppo; la conoscenza del lavoro entro i confini dello spazio e del tempo, così come quelli all'interno dei confini psicologici; la chiarezza circa il lavoro sui ruoli e sui compiti; il lavoro con gli aspetti fenomenici del gruppo come-un-tutto avendo la capacità di generare ipotesi di lavoro sul gruppo e sul suo funzionamento organizzativo.


Keywords: Tavistock; Group Relations; dinamiche; inconscio; proiezione; introiezione; transfert; controtransfert

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Eliat Aram, Mannie Sher, in "RICERCA PSICOANALITICA" 1/2013, pp. 89-106, DOI:10.3280/RPR2013-001006

   

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