Nicholas Steno's challenge for Truth.

Stefano Miniati

Nicholas Steno's challenge for Truth.

Reconciling science and faith

Though undoubtedly representing a key-figure in the modern history of science, unaccountably few if any studies have been hitherto devoted to a illustration of the science-faith relationship in the life and works of the Dane Nicholas Steno (1638-1686), one of the greatest anatomists of his century, founder of geology and crystallography, who, once in Tuscany, recanted his previous Lutheran faith for Catholicism, took the Holy Orders and was finally beatified by Pope John Paul II.

Edizione a stampa

33,50

Pagine: 336

ISBN: 9788856814309

Edizione: 1a edizione 2009

Codice editore: 871.18

Disponibilità: Buona

Pagine: 336

ISBN: 9788856820652

Edizione:1a edizione 2009

Codice editore: 871.18

Possibilità di stampa: No

Possibilità di copia: No

Possibilità di annotazione:

Formato: PDF con DRM per Digital Editions

Informazioni sugli e-book

The 17th century science-religion relationship is by all means one of the most intriguing topics of the history of modern culture, which not by chance has been receiving increasing attention from the science, theology and culture historians.
Though undoubtedly representing a key-figure in the modern history of science, unaccountably few if any studies have been hitherto devoted to a thorough illustration of the science-faith relationship in the life and works of the Dane Nicholas Steno (1638-1686), one of the greatest anatomists of his century, founder of geology and crystallography, who, once in Tuscany, recanted his previous Lutheran faith for Catholicism, took the Holy Orders and was finally beatified by Pope John Paul II.
Close friend of Malpighi, Viviani, Redi and Magalotti, in contrast with Magliabechi and Borelli, he was fully inserted in the Galilean heritage of the Cimento Academy. Unlike Galileo, he never was at odds with the religious hierarchies, nor did he perceive any substantial clash between his philosophy and his theology. Renewed inquiries made in the Florentine libraries and archives, as well as in Steno's published texts, show how relevant, both scientifically and religiously, was his relationship with the Medici family and Cosimo III in particular. Endowed with a deeply Christian conscience, this "spiritual son of Florence" (as he considered himself) tried to conciliate science and faith through a life path that, even if not always consistent, by all means remains an emblem of the Scientific Revolution.

Stefano Miniati took his degree in philosophy in 2002 at the University of Florence; after having obtained a scholarship on religious studies at the University of Milan "Bicocca", he devoted his researches to the relationship between Christianity and the modern world, and finally to the history of science, obtaining in 2007 a four-year scholarship from the University of Siena, where at present he teaches Bioethics and Philosophical Counseling. In 2009 he discussed a Ph.D. thesis in history of science at the University of Pisa on the relationship between religion and science in the early modern world.



Introductory Remarks
(Science and Religion in the Early Modernità. A Brief Historiographical Survey; Nicolas Steno's Scientific Method and Religious Faith; How Science Leads to Religion and Vice-versa in Steno's Thought; Bibliographia Stenoniana: A Brief Account)
The Beginnings in Copenhagen (1659)
(Steno's Early Cartesianism; Chemistry and Iatrochemistry; Moral Issues in the Chaos: Catholic Readings; Moral Issues in the Chaos: Frugality and Diakonia; Cartesianism, Iatrochemistry and Religious Troubles)
The Dutch Permanence (1660-1664)
(Harsh Disputes; Sensible and Public Scientific Experiences; Correct Experiments in Anatomy: Reason and Anatomical Preparations; Correct Anatomical Experiences and God's Providence)
Steno's Relationship with Jan Swammerdam: Scientific and Religious Developments
(Scientific Perspectives Science Through Images; Religious Perspectives Bourignon's God; An Impossible Encounter; Epilogue: The Science-Faith Relationship)
French Period (1664-1667)
(Steno's Ecounter with Jansenism and Anti-Jansenism; Steno's Understanding of the Eucharist; The Issue of Human Freedom)
Steno's Cartesianism and His Relationship with the "Deformer" of Descartes' Philosophy: Baruch Spinoza
(The Trouble of the Mind-Body Relationship; Criticism of Descartes Between Science and Religion; Spinoza as "Deformer" of Descartes; The Nature of Steno's Endorsing of the Cartesian Mechanism)
Steno's Science After His Conversion and Ordination (1667-1677)
(A Dane in Florence; Scientists go Hunding and Fishing; A Memorable Christi Dei Procession; Between Science and Faith; Science and Religious Mission)
From Scientific Researches to Religious Controversies (1670-1678)
(The Technological Disputes and the Value of the Magisterial Authority; The Method to be Applied in Controversies: The "Reasonableness" of Catholicism, and the Strength of "Experience"; Scientific Reasoning and Theological Argumentation; Conclusive Remarks; Appendix: Relevant Aspects of Steno's Conversion to Catholicism)
Nicholas Steno, "Spiritual Son of Florence"
(Cosimo III Re-considered; Working Alongside the Prince: Steno as a State Councilor; Steno, Jansenism and the Dutch Catholic Church; The 17 th Century Florentine Formation of the Tridentine-like Clergy; and Steno's Priestly Apprenticeship; Re-considering Steno's Relationship with the Grand Duke Cosimo III)
What was the Inquirer of Truth Searching for?
Bibliography
Index of Names
Index of Tables.

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